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The United States Constitution: A Four Part Series

Below, is a four part series on the United States Constitution, done by Gary Hunt from the Outpost of Freedom and Kyle Rearden from The Last Bastille blog.


constitution 1

 

United States Constitution: Drafting and Ratification, 1 of 4

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British domination, much like the absolute despotism of the current American government, oppressed the colonists severely enough to warrant a genuine restoration of their common rights as Englishmen. As the hubris of the Parliament increased, the colonists realized that in order for their liberties to be secured again, they would have to secede from the Crown. Once they had defeated what was then the most awesome empire on the battlefield, with little more than a sparsely equipped continental army and disparate militia units, the more important struggle to follow was to decide the question of, “How should we then live?”

Referenced literature includes:

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Many patriots have claimed over the years that they are willing to fight and die for the Constitution, but what exactly are they willing to fight and die for? By examining the Preamble and Articles I – VII, we discover what the Constitution actually says, and what enumerated powers were delegated to the federal government. Are the first seven articles of the Constitution a “bill of rights” unto itself, as Alexander Hamilton claimed in Federalist Paper #84, or are they something wholly different?

Referenced literature includes:

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During the ratification period of the 1780s, the Framers of the United States Constitution sought to remedy the defects inherent within the Articles of Confederation that had already provided a republican form of limited government. Those opponents of ratification demanded that a bill of rights be included as a reasonable compromise to act as a counterweight to the noticeably increased powers of government as enumerated in the Constitution, which were missing from the Articles. Over two centuries have passed since then, and therefore the time has come to examine the Bill of Rights line by line in order to judge whether or not the federal government has respected individual liberty.

Referenced literature includes:

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After learning about the various clauses within the 1787 federal Constitution, many people have come to the conclusion that perhaps this Constitution has nothing at all whatsoever to do with human liberty. Over two centuries has passed since its ratification, so a reevaluation into the efficacy of the Constitution for the purpose of securing liberty must be broached. Has “the Great Experiment” increased freedom in any practical way, or is it now time to explore other avenues that do not rely on the use of this paper cage?

Referenced literature includes:

Matt's Meme

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